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High Voltage HEMP Filters


High Voltage Surge Suppressors

High Voltage HEMP Filters

High Voltage High-altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) Filters are designed to protect sensitive electronics equipment during hazardous transient conditions. They can suppress transients resulting from a high altitude electromagnetic pulse (EMP) event and will help meet the requirements of MIL-STD-188-125.

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Features:

  • Protects sensitive electronics equipment during hazardous transient conditions
  • Absorb a potentially destructive overshoot voltage
  • Exhibits high off-state impedance that appears transparent to the circuits they protect
  • Helps meet the requirements of MIL-STD-188-125

Specifications:

Specifications


High Voltage HEMP Filters

Capacitance Rating Typically less than 5pF per circuit
Clamping Voltage Can be specified from 8 volts to 700 volts
Number of Circuits Limited by only case size, typically up to 50
Connections MIL circular "D" connector, terminal block, RJ connector terminal logs, etc.
Mounting Captive nut inserts, locking inserts, flanges, etc.
Dimensions Typical API case is 3.5"x2.5"x2.5" but will consider and case size and custom shapes
Manufactured to meet typical miliatary environmental requirements

What is a transient threat?


A hazardous transient threat is any unexpected or unanticipated change in voltage caused by an unpredictable and sometimes unprecedented occurrence. Very often it is a random electrical phenomenon such as a high voltage or current pulse for a brief duration of time. Besides HEMP, these threats also include electromagnetic pulse (EMP), nuclear electromagnetic pulse (NEMP), inductive switching (EMI), lightning strike and electrostatic discharge (ESD).

These High Voltage HEMP Filters are designed to protect sensitive electronics equipment during hazardous transient conditions. These surge suppressors are employed to absorb a potentially destructive overshoot voltage. Under normal operating conditions, the suppressor circuit exhibits high off-state impedance that appears transparent to the circuits they protect. If a voltage exceeding the switching voltage is applied to the circuit, the suppressor circuit switches to very low impedance effectively shorting out the high voltage. The suppressor circuit will remain in the low impedance state until the current flowing through the suppressor is either interrupted or drops to a safe level. Once this occurs, the suppressor resets and returns to a high off-state impedance.